The vision for Mac Point

The new vision for Mac Point puts front and centre uses that showcase Tasmania’s strengths – arts, culture, design, tourism and science.

At just over nine hectares, the site adjoins the Hobart docks and waterfront and sits adjacent to the Regatta Grounds, the Cenotaph and the Queens Domain. Mac Point is one of the last remaining vacant urban infill sites adjacent to a working port on the edge of the capital city’s CBD. It’s a development which will deliver an extraordinary precinct for Tasmanians and the nation.


Listening to feedback from the community and key stakeholders, in late 2016 the Tasmanian Government engaged with the Mona team to realise a new vision for the site.

The Tasmanian Government put forward the bold reset vision for Mac Point, which fulfilled the brief to maximize public spaces and cement the project as a national landmark. The reset was overwhelmingly embraced by the wider Tasmanian community and stakeholders.

The vision encourages cultural and public spaces to sit alongside land uses which could include a conference centre, hotels, retail and an Antarctic and Science Precinct. Mac Point is an ideal location for scientific research to complement our Antarctic and oceanic research links and support Tasmania’s status as Australia’s Antarctic gateway. Tourism developments, such as the Antarctic-themed eco-tourism project Eden Hobart, may also form part of the reset.

Under the new plan the area will be developed to include 50 per cent public space, as well as exhibition space, commercial space, cultural space, accommodation, tourism infrastructure and ultimately, genuine waterfront development.

In order to make the vision a reality the State Government is putting in place new legislation. Since the Corporation was established, its major focus has been on the remediation of the site and planning for what is a very bright future for one of the last great inner-capital city development projects.

With the remediation work well underway the Corporation is now preparing to move into the investment and development phase of the project.

The legislation will enshrine the master plan as the vision for Mac Point, provide certainty for investors and the community and clarify planning issues.

There are a range of projects underway at Mac Point that will energise the site whilst furthering the site’s purpose of science, art, culture and tourism.

The new vision for Mac Point puts front and centre uses that showcase Tasmania’s strengths – arts, culture, design, tourism and science.

At just over nine hectares, the site adjoins the Hobart docks and waterfront and sits adjacent to the Regatta Grounds, the Cenotaph and the Queens Domain. Mac Point is one of the last remaining vacant urban infill sites adjacent to a working port on the edge of the capital city’s CBD. It’s a development which will deliver an extraordinary precinct for Tasmanians and the nation.


Listening to feedback from the community and key stakeholders, in late 2016 the Tasmanian Government engaged with the Mona team to realise a new vision for the site.

The Tasmanian Government put forward the bold reset vision for Mac Point, which fulfilled the brief to maximize public spaces and cement the project as a national landmark. The reset was overwhelmingly embraced by the wider Tasmanian community and stakeholders.

The vision encourages cultural and public spaces to sit alongside land uses which could include a conference centre, hotels, retail and an Antarctic and Science Precinct. Mac Point is an ideal location for scientific research to complement our Antarctic and oceanic research links and support Tasmania’s status as Australia’s Antarctic gateway. Tourism developments, such as the Antarctic-themed eco-tourism project Eden Hobart, may also form part of the reset.

Under the new plan the area will be developed to include 50 per cent public space, as well as exhibition space, commercial space, cultural space, accommodation, tourism infrastructure and ultimately, genuine waterfront development.

In order to make the vision a reality the State Government is putting in place new legislation. Since the Corporation was established, its major focus has been on the remediation of the site and planning for what is a very bright future for one of the last great inner-capital city development projects.

With the remediation work well underway the Corporation is now preparing to move into the investment and development phase of the project.

The legislation will enshrine the master plan as the vision for Mac Point, provide certainty for investors and the community and clarify planning issues.

There are a range of projects underway at Mac Point that will energise the site whilst furthering the site’s purpose of science, art, culture and tourism.

  • Mona’s Macquarie Point vision aims to shine a light on the state’s dark past

    11 months ago
    Capture

    An article published in The Mercury on 9 December 2016 writes: HOBART’S waterfront would be home to the nation’s first cultural precinct which acknowledges Australia’s dark history of colonial warfare, under a plan to be unveiled by Mona.

    Mona’s founder David Walsh and creative director Leigh Carmichael have revealed the centrepiece of its vision for Macquarie Point – a National Truth and Reconciliation Art Park.

    An article published in The Mercury on 9 December 2016 writes: HOBART’S waterfront would be home to the nation’s first cultural precinct which acknowledges Australia’s dark history of colonial warfare, under a plan to be unveiled by Mona.

    Mona’s founder David Walsh and creative director Leigh Carmichael have revealed the centrepiece of its vision for Macquarie Point – a National Truth and Reconciliation Art Park.

  • Mona’s Macquarie Point vision the ‘outcome Hobart deserves’, says David Walsh

    11 months ago
    Capture

    An article published in The Mercury on 10 December 2016 writes: THE Hobart waterfront would be home to a music bowl, a day and night produce market, a nationally significant Aboriginal cultural precinct, hotels and conference centre, and an integrated transport hub for light rail, under a plan by the team behind Tasmania’s ­Museum of Old and New Art.

    An article published in The Mercury on 10 December 2016 writes: THE Hobart waterfront would be home to a music bowl, a day and night produce market, a nationally significant Aboriginal cultural precinct, hotels and conference centre, and an integrated transport hub for light rail, under a plan by the team behind Tasmania’s ­Museum of Old and New Art.

  • Macquarie Point: Questions over waterfront plans as MONA unveils Hobart Aboriginal art park vision

    11 months ago
    Capture

    An article published by the ABC on 12 December 2016 writes: The Tasmanian Government has been accused of sending mixed messages over its vision for Hobart's Macquarie Point.

    Hobart's Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) has announced plans to transform the industrial site into a cultural precinct celebrating Tasmania's Aboriginal history.

    An article published by the ABC on 12 December 2016 writes: The Tasmanian Government has been accused of sending mixed messages over its vision for Hobart's Macquarie Point.

    Hobart's Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) has announced plans to transform the industrial site into a cultural precinct celebrating Tasmania's Aboriginal history.

  • MONA waterfront vision to cost $2 billion, likely to change over 30-year timeframe

    11 months ago
    Capture

    An article published on the ABC on 12 December 2016 writes: Plans to transform Hobart's Macquarie Point being touted by the Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) comes with a $2 billion price tag and could take 30 years.

    More details have been released of MONA's vision for the former industrial site but the Premier Will Hodgman said it was likely be different from what would eventually be delivered.

    An article published on the ABC on 12 December 2016 writes: Plans to transform Hobart's Macquarie Point being touted by the Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) comes with a $2 billion price tag and could take 30 years.

    More details have been released of MONA's vision for the former industrial site but the Premier Will Hodgman said it was likely be different from what would eventually be delivered.

  • MONA unveils vision for Hobart’s Macquarie Point renewal

    11 months ago
    Capture

    An article published on ArchitectureAU on 14 December 2016 writes: The Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) has unveiled its vision for a major redevelopment of Macquarie Point in Hobart, Tasmania.

    In November 2015, MONA was appointed by the Tasmanian government to shape the public space component of a masterplan to transform a 9.3-hectare former industrial site on Hobart’s waterfront into a dynamic, mixed-use precinct. The team behind the masterplan, which was made public in June 2015, includes John Wardle Architects, 1+2 Architecture, Leigh Woolley Architecture & Urban Design, Inspiring Place, Taylor Cullity Lethlean, Village Well and Navire.

    An article published on ArchitectureAU on 14 December 2016 writes: The Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) has unveiled its vision for a major redevelopment of Macquarie Point in Hobart, Tasmania.

    In November 2015, MONA was appointed by the Tasmanian government to shape the public space component of a masterplan to transform a 9.3-hectare former industrial site on Hobart’s waterfront into a dynamic, mixed-use precinct. The team behind the masterplan, which was made public in June 2015, includes John Wardle Architects, 1+2 Architecture, Leigh Woolley Architecture & Urban Design, Inspiring Place, Taylor Cullity Lethlean, Village Well and Navire.